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North Canyon Orthopedics offers unique therapy option

North Canyon Orthopedics offers unique therapy option

North Canyon Orthopedics offers unique therapy option

Toby Anderton, orthopedic surgeon, measures Shellie Amundson's hip range of motion as she pedals the Matrix ROM-3 bike Friday at North Canyon Orthopedics in Twin Falls. JULIE A. FERRARO, TIMES-NEWS

Toby Anderton, orthopedic surgeon, measures Shellie Amundson’s hip range of motion as she pedals the Matrix ROM-3 bike Friday at North Canyon Orthopedics in Twin Falls.

By Times-News, magicvalley.com - JULIE A. FERRARO

TWIN FALLS — It might look like a high-tech exercise bike, but it’s far more.

The Matrix ROM-3 model at North Canyon Orthopedics is capable of aiding patients with sensitive physical therapy knee and hip injuries or related surgeries, orthopedic surgeon Toby Anderton said.

ROM stands for range of motion, and the bike is designed to limit the motion of the leg or hip by adjusting the geometry of the pedals on large metal disks with various channels and settings.

The adjustments make it possible for patients to retrain their muscles after being immobile for an extended period, as with Shellie Amundson, North Canyon Medical Center’s community relations director.

Amundson had surgery nine weeks ago on her right knee, and she wasn’t allowed to bend her leg for an extended period.

As Amundson regains muscle function, Anderton orders the range of motion to be gradually increased by 10 degrees every 10 days.

Toby Anderton, orthopedic surgeon, adjusts the pedals on the Matrix ROM-3 bike on Sept. 6 at North Canyon Orthopedics in Twin Falls. JULIE A. FERRARO, TIMES-NEWS

Toby Anderton, orthopedic surgeon, adjusts the pedals on the Matrix ROM-3 bike on Sept. 6 at North Canyon Orthopedics in Twin Falls.

Amundson is delighted with the equipment — not just because she works for the facility that owns it.

“It seems like no big deal until you’re the patient,” she said.

Sitting on the Matrix ROM-3 on Sept. 6, Amundson placed her feet on the pedals and tested the motion, while Jeremiah Yates, a doctor of physical therapy, measured how far her knee was moving with a goniometer.

Yates could then make the proper adjustments to the pedals.

Jeremiah Yates, doctor of physical therapy, measures Shellie Amundson's range of motion Sept. 6 on the Matrix ROM-3 bike Sept. 6 at North Canyon Orthopedics in Twin Falls.

Jeremiah Yates, doctor of physical therapy, measures Shellie Amundson’s range of motion Sept. 6 on the Matrix ROM-3 bike Sept. 6 at North Canyon Orthopedics in Twin Falls.

There’s more to the ROM-3, though. Anderton explained how the technology is being upgraded at the end of September to include a unit used at home. Patients using the bike will be able to track their progress via links to an iPad, tablet or phone.

“Especially in the case of athletes, the daily, minute-by-minute feedback is a confirmation of their progress, so they make better progress sooner,” Anderton said.

Physical therapists will also be able to remotely gauge the range of motion when the Bluetooth knee brace is strapped on the patient’s leg.

Retraining the muscles to move in certain ways, increasing the range of motion and improving the rehabilitation experience are among the reasons Anderton decided to add the Matrix ROM-3 to the array of other equipment at the office.

The next step, after integrating the new technology later this month, will be to meet with other providers in the Magic Valley to encourage them to make the unit available to their patients.

In the end, it’s about getting people back to their normal lives, Anderton said.

“I want my patients to have a great experience.”

North Canyon Orthopedics and Sports Medicine